Saturday, February 2, 2013

The Evolution of Communication


I found this picture on stumbleupon last night and immediately thought of this class. It's basically a summary of what we've been talking about thus far and supports the article "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" It seems to be saying that we've reached our maximum potential and Twitter is going to be our downfall. I can see how this makes sense, but on the other hand, I can see this as a good thing. Fewer characters could be representative of our limited knowledge. OR it could just mean we are being challenged to say what we need to in fewer words. We have to get to the point instead of adding fluff and stuff. Of course, this potential for intelligence is negated when ppl tlk like this 2 make thr pt n lmtd chrctrs. (Oh WOW that was hard to do! How do people write like this voluntarily?????)
What do you think? Do you see another message in this comic?

7 comments:

  1. I agree with you, I do not see conciseness in writing as an inherently bad thing. And I also think the article is a little skewed in that it presents Twitter as the pinnacle of our civilization. Mass publication certainly is still a viable aspect of our culture, and I have a $500 textbook bill to prove it. I would even go so far to say that the internet lingo you used at the end of your post isn't inherently bad either. Different mediums call for different prose. For example, while such jargon may not have any place in a college paper, it may stand as a clever way to escape Twitter's character limit.

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  2. Well the picture is portraying communication now as so basic a "caveman" could do it. The peak is obviously the mass publication-print era, which I'm sure the author of "Amusing Ourselves to Death" would agree with! I agree with the fact that Twitter is an opportunity for us to be challenged to say what we need in fewer words, but who really takes on the challenge to write intelligently through Twitter? Most people write how you did, in abbreviated form. Twitter may be the best form of communication technologically, but not necessarily the best intellectually.

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  3. conciseness challenges your brain to expand your vocabulary to use words you haven't thought about in a while. It challenges your brain to learn new words. Sure, twitter is filled with nonsense, but being able to effectively communicate in 140 characters or less is not a hindrance.

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  4. I think twitter has great potential. It may encourage one to not write "correctly," but it still encourages one to think critically when they make a post. A few years ago we saw the power of twitter when oppressed citizens in Egypt used the social networking tool to organize and overthrow a government. Without social networking, organizing an entire nation would not have been possible. This makes me feel optimistic about the potential for aspects of the Internet like twitter. The internet has the potential to give people more power. It is up to us to use the Internet to advance social issues, but this is only possible if we resist becoming distracted by the overflow of trivial information on the Internet.

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  5. I think that the use of fewer words for a Tweet makes it harder for people to get their thoughts across. It makes the process of choosing words seem impossible (at least that is how I feel whenever I get myself to actually tweet something). Honestly I think Twitter is great if you want to try to exercise your writing skills and limit your thoughts to just 140 characters. At the same time shortening words are irritating (I hate it when others do it all the time) but I don’t think that necessarily degrades someone’s intelligence or a cultures communication skills. What I mean is that not everyone uses Twitter to communicate and communication changes all the time, as this comic shows. Sometimes it’s more simple concept like the caveman and today’s representation (they are wearing the same outfit) than that of movable type. But at the time when all of these occur they were not easy tasks to do. Yes to compile a tweet does not take knowledge of rocket science to do, but it does take advanced technology to do so—as does everything else depicted in the comic.

    The comic is funny as a representation of how communication has gone down in sophistication I guess you would call it. I just think it represents a small portion of what today’s communication is like.

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  6. Because I'm a creative writing major, I view tweets as a restrictive form (like a sonnet or a haiku). The restriction of my message to only 140 characters usually forces me to consider my words, or the way I want to order them. What's really cool, is that it forces people to do this without realizing it. The way I see it, everyday Twitter users are being forced to think like poets (which is pretty damn cool).

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  7. Haha, yes I see your point. I think the comic makes a good point because that does seem to be true to an extent. But I think things like twitter help get information out to the mass public faster. Yes, people abuse the heck out of media and they voluntarily exploit themselves. But I think it's only a matter of time before we have learned through our mistakes. Many people have no faith in our generation because of all of this "technology." But I also think this is just another something that we will all learn from and then when we are old - we will look at the next generation and what they have and say the same thing.

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